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Yuri!!! on Ice – Aria (Stammi Vicino, Non Te Ne Andare)

December 31, 2016

Aria (Stammi Vicino, Non Te Ne Andare) – Aria (Stay Close to Me, Never Leave)

Sento una voce che piange lontano
Anche tu, sei stato forse abbandonato?

I hear a voice crying in the distance
Perhaps you, too, have been abandoned?

Orsù finisco presto questo calice di vino
e inizio a prepararmi
Adesso fa’ silenzio

Come, let’s quickly finish this glass of wine
And  I start to prepare myself
Now, be silent

Con una spada vorrei tagliare quelle gole che cantano d’amore
Vorrei serrare nel gelo le mani che scrivono quei versi d’ardente passione

With a sword I would cut those throats that sing of love
I would enclose in ice the hands that write those verses of fiery passion

Questa storia che senso non ha
Svanirà questa notte assieme alle stelle
Se potessi vederti dalla speranza nascerà l’eternità

This story that has no meaning
Will vanish this night along with the stars
If I could only see you, eternity would arise from hope

Stammi vicino, non te ne andare
Ho paura di perderti

Stay close to me, do not leave
I am afraid to lose you

Le tue mani, le tue gambe,
Le mie mani, le mie gambe,
e i battiti del cuore
si fondono tra loro

Your hands, your legs
My hands, my legs,
And our heartbeats
Are blending together

Partiamo insieme
Ora sono pronto

Let’s leave together
I’m ready now

From → Yuri on Ice!!!

6 Comments
  1. Anna permalink

    Hi! I don’t know if you are Italian or English mother tongue, but I see some minor mistake here I would like to help you with :) I found this translation (looking for lyrics) on animelyrics.com and I thought it was nicer and easier to write to you directly.
    I will write in capital letters the corrections:

    Sento una voce che piange lontano
    Anche tu, sei stato forse abbandonato?

    I hear a voice crying in the distance
    Perhaps you, too, have been abandoned?

    Orsù, finisco presto questo calice di vino
    e inizio a prepararmi
    Adesso fa’ silenzio

    WELL, I quickly finish this glass of wine
    I start to prepare myself
    Now STAY QUIET.
    (in general this sentence sounds a bit weird… but it’s ok, however orsu’ is just a connection word and fa’ is imperative).

    Con una spadA vorrei tagliare quelle gole che cantano d’amore
    Vorrei serrare nel gelo le mani che ESPRIMONO quei versi d’ardente passione

    With a sword I’D LIKE TO cut those throats that sing of love
    I’D LIKE TO enclose in ice the hands that EXPRESS those verses of fiery passion

    Questa storia che senso non ha
    Svanirà questa notte assieme alle stelLe
    Se potessi vederti dalla speranza nascerA’ l’eternitA’

    This story. THAT has no meaning,
    will vanish TONIGHT along with the stars
    If I could only see you, ETERNITY WOULD GROW FROM HOPE

    Stammi vicino, noN te ne andare
    Ho paura di perderti

    Stay close to me, do not ever leave (doesn’t say “ever”. I would just say “don’t go away”).
    I am afraid to lose you

    Le tue mani, le tue gambe,
    Le mie mani, le mie gambe,
    e i battiti del cuore
    si fondono tra loro

    Your hands, your legs
    My hands, my legs,
    And our heartbeats
    ARE BlendING together

    Partiamo insieme
    Ora sono pronto

    Let’s LEAVE together
    I’m ready now

    Good job tho :) I hope I could be of help!

    A.

    • Thank you! I am a native English speaker and have only been studying Italian for a few years, and I also did this translation in a bit of a hurry, so I appreciate your helping me to improve it.

      Regarding “I would” vs. “I’d like to”, that was actually an attempt at elevated, slightly archaic diction to match the song’s operatic tone. “I would” was at one point used to mean “I want to,” like, I don’t know, “I would speak with you” (I want to speak with you) or “what would you with me?” (what do you want with me?) or whatever. I’m sure if I dug around I could find proper examples from Shakespeare or something, but it’s common enough that no specific instance really leaps to my mind. I thought other native English speakers, at least, would get what I’m going for there, but maybe it is too confusing.

      And about esprimono vs. scrivono, though I seem to have been working off a copy of the lyrics with many typos, I did look up the official lyrics just now (http://www.uta-net.com/song/221150/) and they do say scrivono. Listening to the song now, I can definitely hear “esprimono,” but that doesn’t seem to be what was intended. It is a Japanese singer singing in Italian, anyway; there may be odd pronunciations.

      “ETERNITY WOULD GROW FROM HOPE” — My understanding was that “nascere” could mean “to be born from” or “to arise from” as well as “to grow from.” What in this case makes it so that “to be born from” is definitely wrong and “to grow from” is the only correct answer, or is it just that you feel it sounds better or makes more sense?

      “come on! let’s quickly finish this glass of wine…” — This definitely sounds better than “well, I quickly finish…”, but “finisco” is first person singular, right? Can first person singular be used to mean “let’s…”?

      Sorry for the questions, I just want to make sure I fully understand the corrections so that I can apply the knowledge in the future.

      • Anna permalink

        Hi! :)
        so… regarding “I would”, now that you make me think of it, I actually remember something about it from my early days of english classes ages ago :). I just wanted to point out that the meaning of Italian’s condizionale “vorrei” means, generally speaking, “I would like to”, so if “I would” means the same in this case it’s totally fine. To be honest, beside the kind of song which clearly resembles classic opera, the lyrics themselves are not in archaic Italian at all, beside the word “Orsù” which is kind of in disuse now.
        “scrivono” makes more sense since the subject is mani, but the singer clearly says esprimono. I would stick to the original lyrics too, however. Ah, and you are right, the singer has a good pronunciation (Japanese and Italian don’t differ much on sounds), but the accents are all wrong ehe.
        Regarding “to grow”, I just thought it makes a bit more sense, but the thing there was not much about the verb itself (it could be create, or be born or arise as well) but more on the subject of the action. I may have misunderstood the english there but “hope would give birth to eternity” sounded to me much as an action… like that hope actively creates eternity, when in italian the meaning is the contrary, so that eternity comes from hope. I don’t know if I could explain myself ^^. It’s just a detail tho.
        “Finisco” is definitely first person. However, the Orsù there makes the sentence start with an incitement, so I believe it could mean “come on, I finish this glass” as well as “come on, let’s finish this glass” because in Italian there is a form called “plurale maiestatis” (actually coming from latin) in which we use first person plural to mean singular, just to add more energy and incitement in the tone. Here “finisco” is singular, but even if not literal I think it makes much more sense to translate with “let’s finish” because that’s the tone behind.

        Ah! I also noticed a typo in the title “non te NE andare”. I understand that that “ne” is quite tricky for non Italian native people, I have a Japanese friend who always asks me why it exists :)

        Glad I could help! and by the way the translation was quite perfect anyway.

        A.

        • Thank you for the further explanations!

          I can tell the language in the original isn’t very old-fashioned, because if it were I doubt I would be able to understand it, and that’s why I didn’t go very heavily on making the translation sound archaic or anything, but I still feel like it would sound strange for the translation to be too modern and/or casual? It just doesn’t match the style of the song to me–but then there’s a fair amount of modern opera that does have modern and casual diction, and that always sounds weird and sort of wrong to me too, so this may just be my own opera-related hangup.

          Understood about the hope/eternity thing. I can definitely phrase that more passively.

          • Anna permalink

            I totally agree with you about having a too modern language there, it would sound weird. Well, good luck with your translations! :)

  2. Anna permalink

    even better: “come on! let’s quickly finish this glass of wine…

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